children

Picture this: You're 17, you walk into a corner store and grab a Coca-Cola and Doritos, but the cashier refuses to sell them to you because you're underage.

That rule is expected to soon become reality in parts of Mexico, as lawmakers in several states push legislation to keep junk food away from children, partly in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

A lot of summer camps had to close this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including Camp Aranu'tiq in New Hampshire, a camp for transgender and nonbinary children. Julie Be is a music therapist who has helped run the camp since it was founded in 2009 and also one half of the children's musical duo Ants on a Log, alongside Anya Rose. So the stuck-at-home campers would feel connected, Be and Rose put out an open call for songs that reflect the trans and nonbinary experience, use gender neutral pronouns or use humor to talk about gender.

At least 97,000 children tested positive for the coronavirus during the last two weeks of July, according to a new review of state-level data by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Children's Hospital Association. The increase represents a 40% surge in the nation's cumulative total of child cases.

While most children who catch the coronavirus have either no symptoms or mild ones, they are still at risk of developing "severe" symptoms requiring admission to an intensive care unit, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a new report released Friday.

Hispanic and Black children in particular were much more likely to require hospitalization for COVID-19, with Hispanic children about eight times as likely as white children to be hospitalized, while Black children were five times as likely.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

As the world awaits a COVID-19 vaccine, Oklahoma health officials are urging parents to remember routine vaccinations as well.

Routine vaccines can prevent a host of infections, including measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and polio. However, amid the pandemic, local officials are seeing fewer children get those vaccines.

Families are suing TikTok in what has turned into a major legal action in federal court.

Dozens of minors, through their parents, are alleging that the video-sharing app collects information about their facial characteristics, locations and close contacts, and quietly sends that data to servers in China.

As a Black millennial father from the South, Pierce Freelon says he aims to diversify children's music.

"I don't see enough depictions of Black men as nurturers, " he says. "You know, goofy kind of caring caregivers."

U.S. House

As COVID-19 isolates many children and families in their homes, many youth mentorship programs like 4-H have been forced to online formats.

More than 40 members of the U.S. House of Representatives sent a letter to House leadership, advocating for more than $260 million in grant funding to support mentorship programs.

As the pandemic continues, children are still mostly at home. Summer activities are canceled or up in the air, and many children are suffering confusion and stress. Parents may be stressed themselves, but there are ways to help kids feel better.

During the first few weeks of staying at home, Maryam Jernigan-Noesi's 4-year-old son Carter was excited. His working parents were around him most of the day, and it seemed like a big extended weekend. But after a few weeks, she says, things changed.

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Summer camps across Oklahoma are going to look different this year. COVID-19 is forcing camps to cancel, go digital or take extreme measures to keep campers safe.

The state’s reopening plan said summer camps could begin June 1, but the decision to open this summer has weighed heavily on Tom Graney, the executive director of New Life Ranch in Colcord, Okla.

"We’ve had lots of agonizing, frustrating, stimulating conversations and debate about... so we’ve got the OK, but does that mean we do it?," Graney said.

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