Cherokee Nation

Cherokee Nation Names First Delegate To Congress

Sep 3, 2019

The Cherokee Nation has named its first delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. Former Obama appointee Kimberly Teehee's nomination was approved by the tribe's council on Thursday. Although the treaty that created this nonvoting position is almost 200 years old, it had never been filled.

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This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and sitting in for Ryan Kiesel is ACLU Oklahoma Director of Policy and Advocacy Nicole McAfee. They discuss the call by Governor Stitt to remove Glen Johnson as Higher Education Chancellor, a claim by QuikTrip of an increase in property thefts since State Question 780 was passed by voters and the Cherokee Tribe pointing to a nearly 200 year old treaty in calling for representation in Congress.

Anadisgoi: The Offical Cherokee Nation Newsroom

Minimum wage in the Cherokee Nation might soon get a boost.

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief-elect Chuck Hoskin Jr. won’t be sworn in until August 14th, but he has already announced plans for his first executive order.

“We’re gonna raise the minimum wage, through executive order and through the council’s budget, to 11 dollars an hour,” said Hoskin.

Minimum wage for the Cherokee Nation is currently $9.50 an hour. This surpasses Oklahoma’s base pay of $7.25, which matches the federal minimum.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks to Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a challenge to a new alcohol law requiring the manufacturers of the top 25 brands to offer products to all distributors, recent flooding brings national attention in the form of visits from Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke and the Cherokee Nation elects Chuck Hoskin, Jr. to be its next Principal Chief.

Author Margaret Verble taps into her Cherokee heritage for her books, starting with her Pulitzer Prize finalist novel, “Maud’s Line.” Her follow up, “Cherokee America,” takes place in Indian Territory just after the Civil War.

More than three months after the widely criticized decision to release the results of a DNA test to prove her Native American ancestry, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., who is exploring a run for the presidency, has apologized to the Cherokee Nation, according to Julie Hubbard, a spokesperson with the Cherokee Nation.

In 2014, Paul Buckley and his wife, Cheryl Becker, fostered a baby boy named Mason. They had seen other members of their Phoenix church community foster children and were inspired.

"We both have a heart for helping children," Buckley explains. "And it seemed like a way that we could provide something to the community and specifically to children."

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about State Question 800 to create a dedicated account for excessive gross production taxes, the Oklahoma Public Employees Association plans to sue the State Department of Health over layoffs last year following a budget shortfall and Republican candidate Kevin Stitt gets an endorsement from his runoff rival Mick Cornett while Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson gets an endorsement from the Oklahoma Education Association.

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In a video released this week, Massachusetts Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren backed up her long contested claim that she has Native American ancestry, with results from a DNA test and a telling of her family’s story.

President Trump has long taunted Warren’s claims of native ancestry and nicknamed her Pocahontas. At a July rally in Montana, Trump challenged Warren to use genetic testing to prove her claim.

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