America Amplified

The America Amplified: Election 2020 initiative is a national public media collaboration funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, was launched in the fall of 2019 to bring a different kind of reporting into public media coverage of the 2020 election.

In light of current news facing the country, America Amplified has focused on providing resources for public media to continue to engage with the communities they cover.

America Amplified aims to put people, not preconceived ideas, at the center of its reporting process — in this era of “social distancing,” we will be using tools such as crowd-sourcing, polls and social media to listen first to communities across the country.

Updated January 5, 2021

 

KOSU started the Audio Diaries project in 2020 to capture first-hand experiences from Oklahomans around the state on how COVID-19 has impacted their lives. We partnered with the Oklahoma Historical Society to document these oral histories in their archives for future generations. 

 

Now that we've been living with the COVID-19 virus for months and we've covered how it's changed lives and made people concerned for our future - now is the time to search for hope. 

 

America Amplified

This content was provided by America Amplified, a 2020 community engagement journalism initiative funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. You can find the original post here.

Element5 Digital / Unsplash

This election season has already been different than any we've ever seen – especially in terms of the number of Americans who are turning to mailing in their ballots amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Heidi Castro of Stillwater recently made the decision to put her 18-year-long career in education on hold due to COVID-19. In her audio diary for KOSU, Heidi talks about what she misses most about working and how her family is balancing one child being back in school, while the other is distance learning. She also talks about constantly questioning whether or not she made the right decision on not renewing her contract for this school year. 

Chelsea Stanfield/KOSU Radio

After a long stint in the automobile repair industry, Micah Anderson has spent the last couple years going back to his familial roots of farming. In his audio diary for KOSU, Anderson discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic has made his life busier as a farmer and the concerns he has for his handicapped daughter. 

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Brittney Matlock has had a lot of big changes in the past couple months. On top of having a baby and learning her husband was immunocompromised, she and her mother — who co-own a business in Oklahoma City — have had to decide how to operate their three locations during a global pandemic.

In her audio diary for KOSU, she talks about the hard costs of being open and the difficulties behind requiring a mask for all staff and visitors. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Updated July 31, 2020 at 4:46 p.m.

As crazy as it seems, it’s hard to get good information about COVID testing in Oklahoma. We’ve had the same frustrating experiences.

So, here is a practical guide about COVID-19 testing in Oklahoma answering questions we’ve received from our community members. Keep checking back as this post will be continually updated with information we received from the Oklahoma State Department of Health, pharmacies, laboratories, Tribal governments and others.

Photo Provided

Michelle Smock is a co-owner of a spa in Norman with her husband. In her audio diary for KOSU, she talks about the anxiety of shutting down the business temporarily for 2 and a half months before reopening - and the lack of clear guidance on how to reopen or how to respond if an employee contracted COVID-19. 

Photo Provided

Jennifer Thomas is a 36-year-old, self-employed, Black woman living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In her audio diary for KOSU, the Detroit-native discusses her fears and thankfulness for those around her as she waits for the results from the COVID-19 test she had on June 26.

Four Oklahomans Share Thoughts About Tulsa Events This Weekend

Jun 19, 2020
Jessica Dickerson

A mixture of emotion ranging from delight and celebration to fear and anger are converging in downtown Tulsa this weekend. Here are just a few of the people who plan to attend or support the first campaign rally for President Donald Trump in four months, celebrations for Juneteenth and protests.  

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