adoption

A federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled that city contractors must abide by nondiscrimination policies in the placement of foster children with same-sex couples.

A three-judge panel of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the city, which had ended a foster-care contract with an agency of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. That agency, Catholic Social Services, had declined to place foster children in LGBTQ households and sought an injunction that would have forced the city to renew its contract.

Faith-based adoption agencies in Michigan that benefit from taxpayer funding will no longer be allowed to legally turn away same-sex couples or LGBTQ individuals based on religious objection, under the terms of a settlement in a lawsuit alleging the practice constituted discrimination.

A Dec. 17 report on All Things Considered about the Indian Child Welfare Act prompted harsh criticism from the Native American Journalists Association, which called it "inaccurate and imprecise." A meeting between NAJA leaders and NPR editors resulted in a clarification being posted on the online version of the piece, but NAJA members continued to have concerns about the reporting.

Ariana Ude and her mom, Kelli Ude have an honest relationship and that includes how they became family. They came to the StoryCorps mobile booth to reflect on their relationship and Ariana’s adoption.

This story was produced for KOSU by Rachel Hubbard and Dustin Drew, with interviews recorded at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City in early 2018. Locally recorded stories air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

In 2014, Paul Buckley and his wife, Cheryl Becker, fostered a baby boy named Mason. They had seen other members of their Phoenix church community foster children and were inspired.

"We both have a heart for helping children," Buckley explains. "And it seemed like a way that we could provide something to the community and specifically to children."

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Rachel Hubbard / KOSU

Every year, the foster care system in the U.S. is home to nearly half a million kids. A debate is now brewing in state legislatures and Congress about the best way to get these kids in permanent homes and who has the right to take care of them.

Kris Williams and Rebekah Wilson have been dating for four years. They live together in a modest white house on the west side of Oklahoma City with their two dogs and Ozzy, Kris’s son from a previous relationship.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin vetoing Senate Bill 1212 which would have allowed anyone over the age of 21 to carry a gun without a permit while signing Senate Bill 1140 allowing private adoption agencies to deny services to anyone based on religious preferences and the newly created and funded agency which will audit state agencies and decide how they should spend their money and which services to provide.

An LGBTQ group says the signing of a bill allowing for agencies to deny services on the basis of religion is disappointing, but not surprising.

Freedom Oklahoma Executive Director Troy Stevenson says Fallin’s signature on Senate Bill 1140 will make it harder for the 16,000 kids in state care to find homes.

He says he doesn’t understand the argument from supporters saying this will increase the number of agencies for kids to get adopted.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin managed to anger both gun rights and LGBTQ-rights activists late Friday with two separate actions.

In a rare blow to the National Rifle Association, Fallin vetoed a bill that would have loosened gun laws in the conservative state. Had it passed, SB 1212 would have allowed gun owners to carry a firearm — either open or concealed, loaded or unloaded — without a state license or permit. About a dozen states have passed similar so-called "constitutional carry" laws.

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