Adam Schiff

After nearly a month of pronouncements, melodrama, headlines and strife, Round One of memo mania is finally complete.

House Intelligence Committee Republicans went first with their Feb. 2 salvo that alleged "biased" FBI and Justice Department officials had abused their surveillance powers by withholding information from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Then, on Saturday, committee Democrats released a rebuttal giving their perspective on the story — or at least part of it.

Updated at 9:30 p.m. ET

A redacted, unclassified version of a much-anticipated memo drafted by Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and the other Democrats on the House intelligence committee was released Saturday evening just as Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., the panel's chairman, addressed an annual gathering of conservatives.

The House Intelligence Committee voted along party lines Monday to release a controversial memo aimed at bolstering Republicans' attacks against the FBI and Justice Department, over the objections of both.

The decision starts a process seldom, if ever, glimpsed inside Washington's national security world: Now that members of Congress have sought to release the secret document, President Trump has five days to notify the committee of any objection.

If 2016 was the bravura opener and 2017 the tension-building second act, 2018 could deliver an action-packed conclusion to the Russia imbroglio.

Or this story might still be getting started.

Even without knowing every surprise the saga might bring in the new year, there are already enough waypoints on the calendar to confirm that 2018 will ratchet up the volume yet again.

Here are four big storylines to watch.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Jared Kushner went before the House Intelligence Committee today for almost three hours. Adam Schiff of California is the ranking Democrat on that committee. And he joins us from Capitol Hill. Welcome to the program, once again.

On yet another day when President Trump's tweets are dominating the news, the top Republican and Democrat leading the House Intelligence Committee's Russia probe said his tweets aren't quite enough for them.

Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET with additional reporting

The wonkiest soap opera in Washington served up yet more of its trademark plot twists on Tuesday as the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russia detoured even further into partisan bickering.

The upshot of the day's back-and-forth was this: Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a holdover from the previous administration whom President Trump fired on Jan. 31, is not barred by the White House from testifying in open hearings in Congress.

The outlook for a key congressional investigation into potential ties between President Trump and Russia's election meddling remained in doubt Thursday, after an unusual, high-profile flap involving its top two members.

Updated at 7:12 p.m. ET

Explosive accusations and countercharges on Wednesday threatened to derail one of Congress' investigations into the potential connections between President Trump's 2016 campaign aides and Russia's meddling in the election.

The Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Devin Nunes of California, announced that he had learned that then-President-elect Donald Trump and some of his staff had been caught up in U.S. surveillance of foreign targets overseas in the months after the election.

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