The Spy

The Spy is your go-to location for independent, local music and features more than a dozen unique specialty shows that include Indie Rock, Classic Alternative, 80s New Wave, Roots, Reggae, and much, much more. Additionally, The Spy hosts an all-vinyl show, a electronic dance music show, a couple of hip-hop shows, and an Oklahoma music show. Thes­­­­e specialty shows set The Spy apart from traditional corporate radio.

Ferris O’Brien’s brand of The Spy has existed since 1998 when he took over as the Program Director at 93.7 The Spy (KSPI-FM in Stillwater). When station owners took The Spy off the air in 2001, Ferris secured ownership of the brand and moved it to Oklahoma City. In 2002, Citadel Communications launched a deep alternative format radio station (KSYY) and asked Ferris to take the helm. The station was killed in June 2004, but Ferris kept “Spy Radio” on the air as a once weekly specialty show on 100.5 The KATT. In 2009, Ferris purchased 105.3fm from Citadel and relaunched The Spy. When that purchase agreement feel through in December 2010, he took the station completely digital at thespyfm.com. In 2012, The Spy and KOSU established a new partnership that allowed The Spy to return to the FM dial.

You can listen to The Spy 7 days a week from 7pm to 5am, plus 11am-1pm on Sundays, on KOSU-FM 91.7 Oklahoma City, 107.5 Tulsa, 88.3 Stillwater, and 94.9 Ponca City.

You can also listen to The Spy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at thespyfm.com.

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Chris Nguyen

The Oklahoma Music Minute has been featuring recordings of Oklahoma musicians since the pandemic shut down live music.

YouTube

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Julia Leiby / Terry Farris

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