The Spy

The Spy is your go-to location for independent, local music and features more than a dozen unique specialty shows that include Indie Rock, Classic Alternative, 80s New Wave, Roots, Reggae, and much, much more. Additionally, The Spy hosts an all-vinyl show, a electronic dance music show, a couple of hip-hop shows, and an Oklahoma music show. Thes­­­­e specialty shows set The Spy apart from traditional corporate radio.

Ferris O’Brien’s brand of The Spy has existed since 1998 when he took over as the Program Director at 93.7 The Spy (KSPI-FM in Stillwater). When station owners took The Spy off the air in 2001, Ferris secured ownership of the brand and moved it to Oklahoma City. In 2002, Citadel Communications launched a deep alternative format radio station (KSYY) and asked Ferris to take the helm. The station was killed in June 2004, but Ferris kept “Spy Radio” on the air as a once weekly specialty show on 100.5 The KATT. In 2009, Ferris purchased 105.3fm from Citadel and relaunched The Spy. When that purchase agreement feel through in December 2010, he took the station completely digital at thespyfm.com. In 2012, The Spy and KOSU established a new partnership that allowed The Spy to return to the FM dial.

You can listen to The Spy 7 days a week from 7pm to 5am, plus 11am-1pm on Sundays, on KOSU-FM 91.7 Oklahoma City, 107.5 Tulsa, 88.3 Stillwater, and 94.9 Ponca City.

You can also listen to The Spy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at thespyfm.com.

Provided/James Coreas

Normally, the Oklahoma Music Minute gives a rundown of where you can see live music in the state, but the coronavirus pandemic has halted live music in Oklahoma for the time being. And just because you're practicing social distancing doesn't mean you can't find your new favorite band.

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Kimmel and Colbert, Bee and Fallon et al., pay attention: Elmo did not come to play.

The 2020 Tiny Desk Contest closed for entries on April 27. We've seen entries from every state in the country; from big bands and solo artists; and from a huge range of styles and genres — and now, our judges will start to comb through our entries to find a winner. In the meantime, we've been sharing some of favorite entries to this year's Contest.

Bright Eyes has shared "One and Done," the third single released in anticipation of the band's forthcoming new album, set for release sometime this year.

This is No Cover, a production of KOSU and Oklahoma State University and hosted by Matthew Viriyapah. On this episode is Oklahoma City noise-rock band Chat Pile.

It's the week of May 26, 2020 and here's the new music being played on The Spy. This week includes British punk band IDLES' latest single, a quarantine anthem from OK Go whose singer had contracted coronavirus, a new album from Tim Burgess, and so much more.

Congregating in person for concerts is out of the question this spring and for the foreseeable future, so music fans have gotten used to watching performers livestream from home. What's less obvious is that segments of the Nashville music community that work out of view have been equally resourceful in finding virtual stopgaps during lockdown.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Steve Earle is a star of what's sometimes called Americana music or alt-country. He sings of Americans who often live on the edge. One of his hits tells of a grandson of Appalachian moonshiners who turns to drug dealer.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COPPERHEAD ROAD")

STEVE EARLE: (Singing) You better stay away from Copperhead Road.

INSKEEP: Another character is a lifelong criminal who is trapped in an alley and decides, for the first time, to pray.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TOM AMES' PRAYER")

Jimmy Cobb, The Pulse Of 'Kind Of Blue,' Dies At 91

May 25, 2020

Jimmy Cobb, whose subtle and steady drumming formed the pulse of some of jazz's most beloved recordings, died at his home in Manhattan on Sunday. He was 91.

The cause was lung cancer, says his wife, Eleana Tee Cobb.

Cobb was the last surviving member of what's often called Miles Davis' First Great Sextet. He held that title for almost three decades, serving as a conduit for many generations of jazz fans into the band that recorded the music's most iconic and enduring album, Kind of Blue.

Normally, the Oklahoma Music Minute gives a rundown of where you can see live music in the state, but the coronavirus pandemic has halted live music in Oklahoma for the time being. And just because you're practicing social distancing doesn't mean you can't find your new favorite band.

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