Susie Neilson

Dale Knuth, now 58, says that in childhood her weight was a source of anguish — largely because of how her family treated her. "I had a brother who tormented me constantly," she says. "If I came home from school and was hungry and ate an apple, I'd be called a cow, or a pig or whatever."

Her parents, she says, did nothing to stop her brother "except to say, 'Yeah, you're getting fat.' " She had no physical outlet for her frustration — she wanted to play softball, but her mother wouldn't allow it.

The U.S. has the worst rate of maternal deaths in the developed world.

The FDA has approved a new drug that promises a simpler and far more effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. But not everyone is celebrating.

Doctors Without Borders has concerns about a critical bottom-line issue: How much will the drug cost in poor and middle-income countries, where most TB patients reside?

The stakes are so high because the difference between the new regimen — involving a drug called pretomanid — and the current drug regimen is so dramatic.

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

After a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, that left 22 people dead, the company said it would remove from its stores all signs, displays or videos that depict violence in an internal memo.

What if you could put a drop of water into a miniature laboratory — not much bigger than a smartphone — and find out whether the water contains the bacterium that causes cholera?

A simple test like that could help prevent outbreaks of the disease, which sickens as many as 4 million and kills up to 143,000 each year, mostly in poorer countries.

The ancient disease of cholera is spread primarily through drinking water that contains the bacterium called Vibrio cholerae.

When we smear on sunscreen, dermatologist Kanade Shinkai with the University of California, San Francisco says, most of us don't think about it getting under our skin.

"I think there was an assumption that these are things that we apply to our skin — they don't really get into our bloodstream," Shinkai says.

As an ingredient, sesame is pretty popular— it's in tahini and sushi; it's often mixed in granola, sprinkled on bagels or used as a flavoring in an array of dishes. But according to new research, this may be a problem for a substantial number of Americans.

Scientists don't know much yet about the long-term effects of "vape juice," the liquid used in e-cigarettes and vaporizers. But researchers analyzing the liquid and the vapor produced when it's heated say some kinds of e-liquids are reacting to form irritating chemicals called acetals while they're sitting on shelves.

Updated at 4:36 p.m. ET

Maryland leaders and residents are condemning a series of tweets by President Trump on Saturday that attacked Rep. Elijah Cummings and derided the black congressman's district as "a disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess."

The Justice Department's announcement that the federal government will resume its use of capital punishment has raised questions about the drugs it plans to use.

Pages