Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a political correspondent for NPR. He covers the 2020 presidential campaign and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail.

Before that, he worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

The Republican presidential primary race is revolving entirely around the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday.

That's where Colorado Republicans are meeting to elect 13 statewide delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention.

In a contest that takes 1,237 delegates to win the nomination, 13 – or even the full 37 Colorado will send to Cleveland — may seem like a minuscule total.

The Republican presidential primary race is revolving entirely around the Broadmoor World Arena in Colorado Springs, Colo., on Saturday.

That's where Colorado Republicans are meeting to elect 13 statewide delegates to this summer's Republican National Convention.

In a contest that takes 1,237 delegates to win the nomination, 13 – or even the full 37 Colorado will send to Cleveland — may seem like a minuscule total.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'll start the program today looking at two presidential contests playing out in the West. Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic caucuses in Wyoming. He celebrated with supporters at a rally on Long Island, N.Y.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'll start the program today looking at two presidential contests playing out in the West. Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic caucuses in Wyoming. He celebrated with supporters at a rally on Long Island, N.Y.

Hillary Clinton is blasting Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and Donald Trump for foreign policy stances she argues would "make America less safe and the world more dangerous."

Clinton spoke at Stanford University one day after terror attacks killed more than 30 people in Brussels, Belgium. The former secretary of state said, "the threat we face from terrorism is real, it is urgent, and it knows no boundaries."

Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and John Kasich meet Thursday in the 11th debate of this year's Republican presidential primary. It airs at 9 p.m. ET on Fox News.

It's the first forum since Trump won seven states on Super Tuesday, solidifying his status as the candidate to beat in the Republican field. It's also the first debate since last week's raucous insult-fest in Houston.

If Marco Rubio ends up with the Republican presidential nomination, it could be because he played Quidditch better than Donald Trump or Ted Cruz.

Stick with us for a second.

Imagine, for a moment, that Congress is targeting a military base in your state with stiff budget cuts.

Think about what makes you more upset: the fact that this base has long played an important, historic role in your community? Or the fact that the budget cuts could have a rippling negative effect on the local economy?

If you're more agitated by the former, you may be what Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's campaign considers a "timid traditionalist." If, on the other hand, the budget cuts make you more worried, you could be a "temperamental" voter.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Donald Trump has feuded with other candidates, reporters and TV networks during his run for president.

Now, the front-runner for the Republican nomination is feuding with Pope Francis.

On Thursday, the pontiff criticized Trump for the proposal at the heart of his campaign: a pledge to keep people from crossing into the United States illegally by building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

"I'd just say that this man is not Christian if he said it in this way," Francis told reporters in a midflight press conference after a trip to Mexico.

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