Rachel Hubbard

Associate Director/General Manager

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Ways to Connect

After passing teacher pay raises and providing revenue to fund them, some lawmakers thought the teacher walkout would be short lived. However, as the walkout closes in on its fourth day, some are wondering what the options are to provide more revenue to fund education and other core state services.

Following are some of the options lawmakers have talked about in the past that could still be on the table. They have varying levels of support, which is tricky when considering the super majority new revenue measures require. 

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Updated 7:11 p.m.

As House members were preparing to adjourn, Republican Majority Floor Leader Jon Echols announced that he had just been notified by the state Senate that they would hear House Bill 1013XX on Thursday. 

Updated 8:58 p.m.

After more than three hours of discussions behind closed doors, the Oklahoma Senate made quick work of three bills that would help fund a teacher pay raise package and potentially avoid next week’s teacher walkout.

Senators passed three bills Wednesday night:

UPDATED: 11:14 p.m.

A revenue package that included several tax increases passed the Oklahoma House of Representatives Monday night, the first time a tax increase has passed the House in 28 years.

It was a late night for the Oklahoma House of Representatives in an effort to avoid a teacher and public employee walkout next week. After several failed attempts over the last 17 months to find funding for a teacher pay raise, Democrats and Republicans struck a deal over the weekend.

Oklahoma taxpayers are fed up.

Riding high on the oil boom of the late 2000s, the state followed the Kansas model and slashed taxes. But the promised prosperity never came. In many cases, it was just the opposite.

LLUDO / FLICKR (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

The panel that sets the salaries for Oklahoma's lawmakers said Thursday that legislative pay should be more in line with the average Oklahoman.

Legislative pay in Oklahoma is second compared with other states in the region, and with per diem, lawmakers make more than $48,000 dollars during the four month session. That’s almost equal to the median annual household income for the state.

Those statistics led the Oklahoma Legislative Compensation Commission to consider cuts in pay between 8 and 20 percent.

Governor Mary Fallin says she's uncertain what she is going to do with the latest budget bill to cover the $215 million shortfall. She has said in the past she would veto any measure which makes cuts to state agencies and spends cash reserves.

With the latest budget fix, Fallin says lawmakers are kicking the can down the road.

Oklahoma State Senate

In the ongoing budget saga at the Oklahoma State Capitol, there was some bipartisan movement on Monday in the state Senate. Lawmakers have already agreed to increase the cigarette tax and fuel taxes, but the sticking point has been the gross production tax on oil and gas wells.

Last week, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would decrease the tax discounts on oil and gas wells after failing to come to another agreement. That bill only required a simple majority (51 percent) of lawmakers to vote in favor.

Rachel Hubbard / KOSU

Oklahoma is replacing the decks of playing cards they sell in the prison canteens with new custom decks featuring the faces of victims from 52 unsolved homicides and missing persons cases. Other states have similar programs and the program is working.

During the Iraq war, a surprisingly effective tool for the military was a deck of cards distributed to troops featuring the faces of Iraq’s most wanted. Now, law enforcement officials are hoping inmates in American prisons will help play a similar role in unsolved cases.

Allison Herrera

A case that helps determine whether or not the descendants of Cherokee slaves have the full citizenship rights of native Cherokees was decided in United States Federal District Court Wednesday.

After nearly three years, Senior U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan in his ruling said the paramount question to be considered is whether an 1866 treaty between the Cherokee Nation and the United States granted the Cherokee Freedmen, or the descendants of slaves, "all the rights of native Cherokees."

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