Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

The Oklahoma City Zoo is reaching out to adults with Date Nights every Thursday in June.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to talk with Chief Marketing Officer Greg Heanue about the special event.

You can find out more on the Oklahoma City Zoo website.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and siting in for Ryan Kiesel is ACLU Oklahoma Political and Advocacy Director Nicole McAfee about the State Supreme Court overturning a law limiting abortion-inducing medication, Governor Stitt signing a bill forcing abortion clinics to put up signs saying a drug induced abortion is reversible and the governor vetoing a bill giving overtime pay to state workers making less than $31,000 a year.

This Saturday, May the Fourth, comic fans are celebrating Free Comic Book Day.

As in years past, New World Comics in northwest Oklahoma City is holding a 24-hour party from nine o’clock Saturday morning until 9 o’clock Sunday morning.

Owner Buck Berlin says Free Comic Book Day 2019 includes 52 different titles with at least one from the major publishers.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about a ruling by the State Supreme Court saying the lawmakers can't put a $350M cap on pain and suffering, supporters of Medicaid expansion file an initiative petition to get it put on the ballot in 2020 and Governor Stitt recognizes his first 100 days in office.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a lawsuit between the National Rifle Association and it's long time marketing partner Ackerman McQueen out of Oklahoma City, the opioid trial is going before a judge rather than a jury and Comanche County wants in on the trial after taking issue with the settlement between AG Mike Hunter and Purdue Pharma.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the leader of the Senate wanting a more rigorous vetting process for gubernatorial nominations brought before the Senate and another member of the State Supreme Court leaving Governor Stitt with two positions to fill in his first few months in office.

Oklahoma State Senate

A bill to help solve missing persons cases is one step away from becoming law in Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma House and Senate approved House Bill 2640, which would require law enforcement, medical examiners, and coroners to enter all missing and unidentified persons’ information into a national database.

Senator Julie Daniels (R-Bartlesville) says the measure—known as Francine’s Law—will help solve cold cases.

Starting this July, if you sell your car, the license tag stays with you rather than the vehicle.

The Oklahoma Tax Commission is implementing the policy, based off Senate Bill 1339 passed last year and signed by then-Governor Mary Fallin.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the deadline for lawmakers to fund education by April First came and went without a budget despite a teacher walkout last year, state leaders criticize Attorney General Mike Hunter in the settlement with Purdue Pharma and vandals strike central Oklahoma buildings with hate-filled graffiti.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a $270M settlement between Oklahoma and Purdue Pharma with the lion share of the money going to OSU's Health Center in Tulsa, the leader of the Senate forms a working group on Cost of Living Adjustment for state retirees and a number of issues have recently arisen at county jails including Nowata, Washington and Oklahoma.

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