Kateleigh Mills

Special Projects Reporter

Kateleigh Mills returned to KOSU in December 2019 as Special Projects Reporter, following a year-long stint at KWBU in Waco, Texas.

Previously, Mills was a news assistant and All Things Considered host for KOSU from March to December 2018.

She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Central Oklahoma in December 2017. While studying journalism and professional media, she worked with the UCO’s journalism staff to reinvent the campus newspaper for a more multimedia purpose – joining with the campus radio and television stations for news updates and hosting public forums with campus groups.

The Edmond-raised reporter was editor-in- chief of her college newspaper when it won the Society of Professional Journalism award for Best Newspaper in Category B. Mills also received the Oklahoma Press Association Award for ‘Outstanding Promise in Journalism’ at the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame event in 2017. She is also the Oklahoma Collegiate Media Association's recipient for 'College Newspaper Journalist of the Year' in 2017.

Ways to Connect

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Brittney Matlock has had a lot of big changes in the past couple months. On top of having a baby and learning her husband was immunocompromised, she and her mother — who co-own a business in Oklahoma City — have had to decide how to operate their three locations during a global pandemic.

In her audio diary for KOSU, she talks about the hard costs of being open and the difficulties behind requiring a mask for all staff and visitors. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Updated July 31, 2020 at 4:46 p.m.

As crazy as it seems, it’s hard to get good information about COVID testing in Oklahoma. We’ve had the same frustrating experiences.

So, here is a practical guide about COVID-19 testing in Oklahoma answering questions we’ve received from our community members. Keep checking back as this post will be continually updated with information we received from the Oklahoma State Department of Health, pharmacies, laboratories, Tribal governments and others.

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Michelle Smock is a co-owner of a spa in Norman with her husband. In her audio diary for KOSU, she talks about the anxiety of shutting down the business temporarily for 2 and a half months before reopening - and the lack of clear guidance on how to reopen or how to respond if an employee contracted COVID-19. 

KOSU and StateImpact Oklahoma have won 13 awards from the Oklahoma Society of Professional Journalists, Professional Chapter for stories that aired during 2019.

It was a clean sweep in the 'General News' category, as former StateImpact Oklahoma health reporter Jackie Fortiér took first and second place, and former KOSU student reporter Lenora LaVictoire took third place.

Josh Robinson / KOSU

In a city that has razed many of its historic buildings in the mid 20th century in an effort to revitalize Oklahoma City's downtown, future planning is top of mind for two new amendments in the city's planning guide, planOKC.

The Oklahoma City Planning Commission adopted both preserveOKC and adaptOKC as amendments to planOKC.  AdaptOKC is the city's first sustainability plan, while preserveOKC is the first historic preservation plan.

facebook.com/gtbynumfortulsamayor

Starting immediately, face masks must be worn in the City of Tulsa.

On Wednesday evening, Tulsa City Council voted 7-2 to adopt an ordinance that requires the use of face coverings in an effort to control the spread of COVID-19. It's similar to one passed by Stillwater City Council last week.

JAMIE GLISSON

President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa in late June “likely contributed” to a dramatic surge in new coronavirus cases.

The Associated Press reports Tulsa City-County Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Dart said made that statement on Wednesday.

Tulsa County reported 261 confirmed new cases on Monday, a one-day record high, and another 206 cases on Tuesday. During the week before the June 20 Trump rally, there were 76 cases on Monday and 96 on Tuesday.

Mairead Todd / KOSU

Oklahoma becomes the 37th state to expand Medicaid, Stephanie Bice and Terry Neese advance to Congressional District 5 Republican runoff, and more than half of Oklahoma legislative races are now decided.

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Jennifer Thomas is a 36-year-old, self-employed, Black woman living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In her audio diary for KOSU, the Detroit-native discusses her fears and thankfulness for those around her as she waits for the results from the COVID-19 test she had on June 26.

Four Oklahomans Share Thoughts About Tulsa Events This Weekend

Jun 19, 2020
Jessica Dickerson

A mixture of emotion ranging from delight and celebration to fear and anger are converging in downtown Tulsa this weekend. Here are just a few of the people who plan to attend or support the first campaign rally for President Donald Trump in four months, celebrations for Juneteenth and protests.  

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