Kateleigh Mills

Special Projects Reporter

Kateleigh Mills returned to KOSU in December 2019 as Special Projects Reporter, following a year-long stint at KWBU in Waco, Texas.

Previously, Mills was a news assistant and All Things Considered host for KOSU from March to December 2018.

She completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Central Oklahoma in December 2017. While studying journalism and professional media, she worked with the UCO’s journalism staff to reinvent the campus newspaper for a more multimedia purpose – joining with the campus radio and television stations for news updates and hosting public forums with campus groups.

The Edmond-raised reporter was editor-in- chief of her college newspaper when it won the Society of Professional Journalism award for Best Newspaper in Category B. Mills also received the Oklahoma Press Association Award for ‘Outstanding Promise in Journalism’ at the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame event in 2017. She is also the Oklahoma Collegiate Media Association's recipient for 'College Newspaper Journalist of the Year' in 2017.

Ways to Connect

Jenny Mae Harms / KOSU

Health experts have repeatedly recommended the use of face coverings, to go along with social distancing and other guidelines meant to stunt the spread of COVID-19. But those measures have become politicized. Kateleigh Mills with Oklahoma Engaged talked with two Oklahoma voters about how masking and voting in the age of the coronavirus have impacted them.

Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Outrage and unrest following the killings of unarmed Black men and women at the hands of law enforcement has pushed the conversation about police brutality to the forefront as the 2020 election looms. The killing of George Floyd, the 2017 acquittal of a Tulsa officer in the shooting of Terence Crutcher and the police budget reduction in Norman this year are all shaping the way Oklahomans vote. Kateleigh Mills talked with two voters about these issues for Oklahoma Engaged.

Element5 Digital / Unsplash

This election season has already been different than any we've ever seen – especially in terms of the number of Americans who are turning to mailing in their ballots amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some Oklahoma voters have complained about receiving mail that incorrectly tells them that they’re not registered to vote in their area.

Provided

Heidi Castro of Stillwater recently made the decision to put her 18-year-long career in education on hold due to COVID-19. In her audio diary for KOSU, Heidi talks about what she misses most about working and how her family is balancing one child being back in school, while the other is distance learning. She also talks about constantly questioning whether or not she made the right decision on not renewing her contract for this school year. 

Lyric Theatre

America's arts, culture and creative economy was one of the first sectors to be hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, and now data released by the Brookings Institution have numbers to show by how much. 

Chelsea Stanfield / KOSU

Mask mandates continue to be top of mind for Oklahoma officials. As one city council voted to extend theirs, state officials maintained that containing the spread should rest on personal responsibility.

Mairead Todd / KOSU

State Senator Stephanie Bice advances to face Congresswoman Kendra Horn, Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum avoids predicted runoff, three incumbent state Senators lose and Oklahoma County will have its first Black sheriff.

Chelsea Stanfield/KOSU Radio

After a long stint in the automobile repair industry, Micah Anderson has spent the last couple years going back to his familial roots of farming. In his audio diary for KOSU, Anderson discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic has made his life busier as a farmer and the concerns he has for his handicapped daughter. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted this election cycle, with surges in voting by mail or absentee ballot, and the way conventions and debates are held. Even the candidates themselves are changing the way they engage with voters. Kateleigh Mills asked three first-time candidates about their experiences campaigning during a pandemic for Oklahoma Engaged.

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