Asma Khalid

Asian-Americans are a bit of a voting paradox. They're the fastest growing minority group in the country, but they're also the least likely to vote.

Take the 2012 election — Asian-Americans voted Democrat in higher numbers than ever before (73 percent cast a ballot for Barack Obama). But they had the lowest voter turnout of any racial group (47 percent).

To try and narrow that discrepancy, a group of Asian-Americans have created the AAPI (Asian American and Pacific Islander) Victory Fund.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Time now for Snapshot 2016, a series of audio portraits of folks that we've - meeting on the campaign trail, people swept up into the excitement when a candidate comes to town. NPR's Asma Khalid has our latest installment.

Hillary Clinton is generally considered the front-runner in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, but that's not true in one state candidates really want to win — New Hampshire. She's facing a tough challenge in the Granite State from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The New Hampshire primary is Feb. 9, and, with little time left, Clinton is trying to fight back quickly.

Over 25 million Latinos are eligible to vote.

And, each year, that number grows because hundreds of thousands of Latinos turn 18. Hispanics are one of the youngest racial or ethnic groups in the country.

Bob Vander Plaats, the influential president of the conservative Christian group the Family Leader, is endorsing Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

"Our goal is to unite conservatives around Ted Cruz," Vander Plaats said Thursday in the rotunda of the Iowa state capitol. "We believe he'll be the nominee to take on and defeat Hillary Clinton."

Vander Plaats said he told Donald Trump on Wednesday that he would not be endorsing him, but that the two remain friendly.

In the wake of the Paris attacks, a majority of young Americans support sending U.S. ground troops to fight ISIS, according to a wide-ranging new poll from the Harvard Institute of Politics.

The institute has asked millennials about the idea of American boots on the ground at three different times this year, and the survey results have fluctuated somewhat, but there seems to be a "hardening of support."

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