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Oklahoma City Council clears height restrictions that would have hampered nation's tallest building

Height restrictions were lifted for a downtown Oklahoma City development that would be the tallest building in the country if constructed.
Height restrictions were lifted for a downtown Oklahoma City development that would be the tallest building in the country if constructed.

A vision for locating the tallest building in the United States in Downtown Oklahoma City is moving forward.

The Oklahoma City Council removed all height restrictions for a Bricktown property development Tuesday morning.

Ward 7 City Councilwoman Nikki Nice said she’s excited about the prospect of the nation’s largest building in Oklahoma City.

“I mean, the sky's the limit. No pun intended,” she said. “But when you look at the ways that this is our entertainment district, for us to be able to see how we can improve the ways that we create tourism and attraction to our city, I think most of us would say we are in agreement with how we do that.”

The Boardwalk at Bricktown project’s architects say the plan is to ultimately build the massive tower after an initial phase of three smaller ones.

If all goes according to plan, construction of America's tallest building will begin in a few years and be ready for occupancy in five. That would put it in line with the construction timeline of the city’s new $900 million arena.

The skyscraper would be 1,907 feet high to commemorate the year Oklahoma became a state.

“I know some folks are a little nervous to see how this could be built,” Nice said. “But other than that, I've heard most people say they're okay with this and want to see it.”

California-based developer Scot Matteson said he sees the Boardwalk at Bricktown as a pioneering project for Oklahoma City.

“We go into these areas where we see an opportunity of land that's being underutilized,” Matteson said. “And others will follow and kind of latch on to our concept and what we're doing and help grow the city even more.”

But as Nice alluded to, KOSU has reported about some skepticism toward the project. Shannon Burke, who lives just a few blocks from the proposed tower site, summed up her feelings in an interview last month.

“I think it would be a big eyesore,” Burke said. “But if it gets people talking and bringing them to Oklahoma to go see this crazy skyscraper, then it could help the economy.”


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Robby Korth joined KOSU as its news director in November 2022.
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