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Stillwater Teen Writes Dystopian Book On Climate Change

Abhi Sukhdial
Chelsea Stanfield
/
KOSU
Abhi Sukhdial, author of 'Three Days Till EOC'

Earth Day, the birth of the modern environmental movement, turns 51 years old on Thursday.

The holiday, which turned global in the 1990s, continues to inspire new generations of change-makers, like Stillwater teen and published author, Abhi Sukhdial.

In the summer of 2019, Sukhdial wrote Three Days till EOC. The book takes readers into a near-future ravaged by climate change, where extreme weather patterns have wiped out most of mankind. EOC — End of Civilization — is the name of a “Killer Super-Cyclone” scheduled to make landfall in just three days. No one expects to survive the storm.

The book is in line with the issue at the forefront of today’s environmental agenda: climate change.

"I tried to make the theme mostly about legacy, so like if you take the problem [climate change] and you put it into thought now instead of waiting, it’ll help your kids in the future," Sukhdial said.

Sukhdial was just 11 years old when he wrote Three Days till EOC and won the 2019 Stone Soup Annual Book Contest. The book is currently entered in the 2021 Green Earth Book Awards.

Sukhdial credits young climate activist Greta Thunberg as one of his inspirations to write about climate change.

History of Earth Day

Silent Spring by Rachel Carson hit the shelves in 1962. Carson’s “fable for tomorrow” reflected real-life instances where the heavy use of pesticides were directly harming animal, plant and human life across the country.

Around the same time, doctors were treating children for lead poisoning, as lead was often used in paint, pipes, children's toys and gasoline. Despite a 98% improvement in Lead Air Quality since the 1980s, people continue to suffer from lead poisoning across the country.

Then, in 1969, Americans watched in horror as a massive oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. killed wildlife, and witnessed the Cuyahoga River near Cleveland, Ohio, catch fire for the ninth time.

In 1970, President Richard Nixon acknowledged the push to protect people from harmful effects of pollution, thanks to Earth Day supporters, and created the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

In its infancy, the goal of the agency was to establish and enforce environmental standards and begin conducting environmental research. Today, the EPA continues to monitor the health of the environment and gather data through scientific research to ensure Americans have clean land, air and water.

Celebrating Earth Day

This year’s Earth Day celebration will offer a variety of ways to participate. You can go to the Earth Day website, which is hosting a slew of virtual events.

‘Earth Day Live’ is set to stream at 11 a.m. CST on Thursday. Viewers can participate in workshops and watch panel discussions and special performances. Topics include emerging green technologies, regenerative agriculture, climate and environmental literacy and more.

In addition to virtual events, there are many in-person activities as well. Rural and urban communities are celebrating across Oklahoma. Look at your local community bulletin to celebrate Earth Day 2021.

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