Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma Educators Wary Of Political Hopefuls Promising School Funding Without Tax Increases

Public school teachers are watching closely as Oklahoma gubernatorial candidates promote and debate their plans for improving health care, tax policy and education. Alberto Morejon is one of them. Morejon is an 8th-grade teacher at Stillwater Public Schools largely credited with organizing the teacher walkout in April. He now runs a Facebook page with nearly 80,000 followers, many of them Oklahoma educators. More than anything, teachers want to hear candidates detail how they’re going to...

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'I Can See The Goodness In You': Daughter Strives To Be Like Her Mother

Mauree Turner grew up in Ardmore and experienced racism at a young age. When she came to the Story Corps mobilebooth in Oklahoma City, she talked about her mom’s influence on her identity. This story was produced for KOSU by Rachel Hubbard and Dustin Drew, with interviews recorded at the StoryCorps mobile booth in Oklahoma City in early 2018. Locally recorded stories air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU. Thank you to Phillips Murrah law firm for sponsoring...

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Oklahoma City Welcomes Shot at NBA Team

Apr 20, 2008

As basketball fans in Seattle try to find a way to keep the SuperSonics in their city, the Sooner State is gearing up to welcome the team to Oklahoma City.

Michael Cross reports for member station KOSU.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Scandal Plagues Oral Roberts University

Nov 23, 2007

Oral Roberts University is in trouble. The Tulsa, Okla., school founded by evangelist Oral Roberts is the target of several lawsuits. The Christian university also says it is more than $50 million in debt.

And there are allegations that the university's current president, Richard Roberts, and his family spent university money for personal use. Roberts is the son of Oral Roberts.

Scott Gurian reports from member station KGOU in Norman, Okla.

A Half-Century Underground in Tulsa

Jun 15, 2007

Fifty years ago, the citizens of Tulsa, Okla., buried a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere in a vault, in what has to be one of the most interesting time capsules ever.

Mid-century historian and car nut Charles Phoenix has been driving with NPR's Steve Proffitt from Los Angeles to Tulsa to see the '57 Plymouth, which is finally being unearthed this Friday.

But already, those anticipating the car's unveiling have received disturbing news: The vault leaked, and over the years, the Plymouth was submerged in water.

A Journey Back to the Future

Jun 11, 2007

Ride along with mid-century maniac Charles Phoenix and NPR senior producer Steve Proffitt in our series "Destination: Time Capsule," a classic road trip with a twist.

Charles' 1961 mint green metallic Pontiac Bonneville coupe provides trustworthy transportation for a high-octane adventure from Los Angeles to Tulsa, Okla.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

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Education News

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Public school teachers are watching closely as Oklahoma gubernatorial candidates promote and debate their plans for improving health care, tax policy and education.

Alberto Morejon is one of them.

Morejon is an 8th-grade teacher at Stillwater Public Schools largely credited with organizing the teacher walkout in April. He now runs a Facebook page with nearly 80,000 followers, many of them Oklahoma educators.

Hazel O'Neil

Andrea Brawdy, a special education teacher at James Griffith Intermediate School in Choctaw, Oklahoma, just received the first pay raise of her 12-year teaching career: $414 more per month.

Getting this raise was no small feat. Even after teachers around the state demanded a substantial pay increase, they still left their classrooms to take part in a two-week long teacher walkout at the Capitol building this April. They wanted to bring attention to their demands: better pay, better benefits, and better treatment of teachers.

This question came up again and again Tuesday during an at-times heated hearing of the Senate's education committee: Does the law allow schools to use federal money to arm teachers?

The federal money in question comes from Title IV of the big, k-12 federal education law known as The Every Student Succeeds Act. It's a billion-dollar pot intended for what the law calls "student support and academic enrichment."

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