© 2024 KOSU
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Understanding Marjorie Taylor Greene's influence in a Republican-controlled House

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, holds up a "Stop the Steal" mask while speaking with fellow first-term Republican members of Congress on the steps of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, Jan. 4, 2021. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, holds up a "Stop the Steal" mask while speaking with fellow first-term Republican members of Congress on the steps of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, Jan. 4, 2021. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

Sign up for the On Point newsletter here

Find a transcript of our conversation about the 2022 World Cup here.

Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene has become a potent force bridging the Republican Party and the far-right. But where did she come from?

“I can’t tell you how many old faculty or staff of her high school that I talked to, they had no recollection of her whatsoever,” Elaina Plott Calabro, staff writer at The Atlantic, says.

We’ll trace her rise from competitive CrossFit, down the QAnon rabbit hole and all the way to Congress, where Greene is poised to wield much more power in the Republican controlled House.

“She was chagrinned to have seen that the Republicans, when they did possess power, did in her view nothing with it,” Robert Draper says. “And so she intends to see a completion of the MAGA agenda that Trump had begun.”

Today, On Point: Understanding Marjorie Taylor Greene.

Guests

Robert Draper, staff writer at the New York Times. Author of several books, including Weapons of Mass Delusion: When the Republican Party Lost Its Mind. (@DraperRobert)

Tia Mitchell, Washington Correspondent at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (@TIAreports)

Also Featured

Elaina Plott Calabro, staff writer at The Atlantic. (@elainaplott)

Related Reading

The Atlantic: “Why is Marjorie Taylor Greene Like This?” — “She was very late. A man named Barry was compelled to lead the room in a rendition of Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the U.S.A.” to stall for time.”

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

KOSU is nonprofit and independent. We rely on readers like you to support the local, national, and international coverage on this website. Your support makes this news available to everyone.

Give today. A monthly donation of $5 makes a real difference.