Washington D.C.

Updated Jan. 10 at 3:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. government has been operating under a partial shutdown since Dec. 22. The shutdown, driven by a political battle over President Trump's demand that Congress approve funds for a wall along the border with Mexico, is touching the lives of Americans in myriad ways.

More than 900 students in Washington D.C.'s public high schools graduated last year against district policy. That's according to a new report Monday from the D.C. Office of the State Superintendent.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Voters in the District of Columbia passed a measure on Tuesday in favor of petitioning Congress to become a state in the union.

Washington, D.C., will be the next major city to implement a $15 minimum wage rate following a unanimous vote Tuesday by its city council.

In a victory for local and national labor unions, Washington joins the ranks of cities such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle in raising wages for primarily lower-income workers in restaurants, retail and other service industries.

The District's current hourly minimum wage is $10.50, and it was scheduled to go up to $11.50 next month under a law enacted in 2014.

Starting at midnight Tuesday, the D.C. Metro rail system will shut down for 29 hours while authorities investigate potential dangers related to a cable fire on Monday, Metro's General Manager Paul Wiedefeld said at a news conference Tuesday.

Referring to trouble early Monday that caused delays on the Blue, Orange and Silver lines throughout the day, Wiedefeld said the incident showed "commonalities with the cable fire in [the] L'Enfant Plaza [station] a year ago." In that incident, a woman died after being trapped on a train filled with smoke.

You see something happen each time you end up on Lamour Rogers' Washington, D.C., Metrorail train.

As Rogers' voice booms over the public address system, people look up from their phones and newspapers left behind by someone else. They make eye contact. They smile at each other.

NPR's Renita Jablonski met with Rogers to find out what is so special about his voice and where his enthusiasm comes from day in and day out.

A wave of wage increases in cities across the country, as well as at several major businesses, continued on Wednesday.