The World

Weekdays from 2-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

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In a hilltop home near San Diego, California, congressional candidate Ammar Campa-Najjar introduced himself to a group of voters.

Like many other people running for office this election year, especially Democrats, Campa-Najjar is young, 29, and has never run for office before. Campa-Najjar, the US-born son of a Mexican mother and a Palestinian father, spent part of his childhood living in Gaza during a time of relative peace.

A group of Indigenous Australian women, brows furrowed, cheeks glistening, huddle over a hole in the arid desert of Ti Tree. They’ve spotted the remains of a baby kangaroo and they pause momentarily for the life lost deep inside what is now a dry waterhole.

Then they get to work, reaching in to fish out the carcass, telling each other they will need to come back and clean the hole properly.

These women are rangers, working on land their families have lived on for generations.

Here's an explanation about why there's a backlog of immigration cases

Oct 5, 2018

The recent wave of migrants crossing the US-Mexico border tests any already overwhelmed US judicial system.

There’s a push by Washington to send one clear message to Central American families wanting to migrate here: Don’t come.

Or, at least, don’t believe what all the smugglers promise.

“You will not get papers to allow you to stay, and you are putting yourself and your children in grave danger,” Gil Kerlikowske, head of US Customs and Border Protection, said during a press conference earlier this month.

In the summer of 1966, hundreds of farm workers in Texas marched from Rio Grande City to Austin — almost 500 miles over 90 days — to demand change.

They weren’t asking for anything fancy. They wanted better wages, restrooms and uncontaminated water for the people cultivating and picking melons and other crops.

It’s the final countdown until the Republican Party chooses its candidate for President of the United States and, even with a running mate named, it feels like a lot is still up in the air.

Kentucky's current political office holders are not necessarily kind to the nation's newcomers. Before Matt Bevin entered the governor's mansion, he joined the chorus of Republican governors who claimed they'd refuse the resettlement of Syrian refugees after last November's terrorist attacks in Paris.

John Kerry: 'It is a dangerous time.'

Sep 27, 2018

John Kerry served as Barack Obama's secretary of state for four years.

Before that, he spent five terms as a US senator. He cataloged all that time in a new memoir, "Every Day Is Extra." 

It's from that long vantage point that Kerry looks at the administration of Donald Trump. Kerry says Trump's tweets are crowding out meaningful discussion of the important issues.  

Every day, Brent Olson travels some 20 minutes by train into Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside neighborhood. He has a degenerative hip disorder and uses a walker to get around. But there’s no way he’d miss this clinic appointment.

“The best decision I’ve ever made in my life was coming here,” Olson said. “I wouldn’t be sitting here talking with you. I’d be dead.”

“Sir, I had not made much of the time through my sickness and I am asking you Sir to grant me the favour of allowing me a little more time to stay here so that I’ll be able to make a little money to carry home not that I am effecting the powers of this country but I am only appealing to you Sir.”

This is how Cecil Roach’s June 1945 letter to US President Harry S. Truman, dictated to an unnamed typist, ends.

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