Morning Edition

Weekdays from 5-9 a.m.
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene, Rachel Martin, Noel King
  • Local Host Michael Cross

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep, David Greene, and Rachel Martin, and locally by KOSU's Michael Cross in Oklahoma City.

Ways to Connect

This story is the first in NPR's new Morning Edition series produced by The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva) called The Keepers, stories of activist, archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians — keepers of the culture and the cultures and collections they keep.

Over a decade ago, students of Dr. Marcyliena Morgan, then a Professor of Linguistics at UCLA, started dropping by her office, imploring her to listen to hip-hop.

You may have noticed some changes to your Morning Edition listening experience this week. That's because NPR has changed the timing of their 'clock.' It's the first change to Morning Edition's clock since 2014.

NPR provides 'clocks' for most of their national shows, so local stations like KOSU know when to best air local news, weather and information.

My back hurts when I sit down.

It's been going on for 10 years. It really doesn't matter where I am — at work, at a restaurant, even on our couch at home. My lower back screams, "Stop sitting!"

To try to reduce the pain, I bought a kneeling chair at work. Then I got a standing desk. Then I went back to a regular chair because standing became painful.

I've seen physical therapists, orthopedic surgeons and pain specialists. I've mastered Pilates, increased flexibility and strengthened muscles. At one point, my abs were so strong my husband nicknamed them "the plate."

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

Fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin tells NPR's Morning Edition that political forces in the Trump administration want to privatize the VA — and that he was standing in the way.

"There are many political appointees in the VA that believe that we are moving in the wrong direction or weren't moving fast enough toward privatizing the VA," he said. "I think that it's essential for national security and for the country that we honor our commitment by having a strong VA. I was not against reforming VA, but I was against privatization."

Photos by Mike Morgan and Sandy Honig

Starting soon Ailsa Chang will host All Things Considered along with Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro; and Noel King will join David Greene, Steve Inskeep and Rachel Martin as the fourth host of Morning Edition and the Up First podcast.

House Republican Conference

The Senate takes up debate on an immigration Monday. Rachel Martin talks to Republican Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma who is among a group of senators introducing an immigration overhaul bill.

Oklahoma taxpayers are fed up.

Riding high on the oil boom of the late 2000s, the state followed the Kansas model and slashed taxes. But the promised prosperity never came. In many cases, it was just the opposite.

cole.house.gov

A bipartisan health care deal was introduced in the Senate. While there's a chance it could pass there, it faces a tougher time in the House. Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma.

cole.house.gov

House Republicans said they will consider restrictions on bump stock gun accessories. Steve Inskeep talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about his position.

TRANSCRIPT:

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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