Ryan LaCroix

All Things Considered Host / Operations Director

Ryan LaCroix joined KOSU’s staff in 2013 after teaching for four years at ACM@UCO. He has been the co-host of The Oklahoma Rock Show since its inception in 2010. Ryan is also a contributing writer for Oklahoma Today magazine and the co-author of two books for the Oklahoma Historical Society. He has served on the Norman Music Alliance Board of Directors since 2013, the governing body of Norman Music Festival. He holds a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Oklahoma and lives in Blanchard with his wife and son.

Ways to Connect

Oklahoma Rock Show: Rewind is your home for the music of Oklahoma’s past.

On this episode, we're playing tunes by Oklahoma guitar wizards. Jazz, country, blues, rock, pop, classical, new age, surf rock (!), indie rock -- they've all had Oklahomans bearing a major influence within the genre. Note: this is not meant to be a comprehensive list. We'll do more of these.

Oklahoma Rock Show: Rewind is your home for the music of Oklahoma’s past.

On this episode, we're exploring Oklahoma's impact on hillbilly music and singing cowboys. Hillbilly music was a label used from the 1920s to the 1950s, and placed on what is now known as country music. Meanwhile, Singing Cowboys was a term used to describe actors and singers that appeared, usually as the role of hero, in early Western B-movies in the 1930s and 1940s.

Lorrie Collins — one-half of the 1950s Oklahoma rockabilly duo The Collins Kids — was one of the earliest leading women of rock and roll music. Collins died on Saturday, as confirmed by her brother and bandmate Larry Collins. She was 76.

Lorrie and Larry were raised on a dairy farm in Pretty Water, near Sapulpa in northeastern Oklahoma in the 1940s.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Every month, NPR Music asks DJs from public radio stations across the country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City R&B and soul duo Adam & Kizzie.

Every month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities around this country to name a new favorite song and, this month, KOSU featured Oklahoma City musician Blaze McKenzie.

Magalie L'Abbé / Flickr

Officials at Oklahoma's Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry are working on rules to regulate the cultivation of industrial hemp.

Governor Mary Fallin signed bipartisan legislation this week that legalizes the crop in the state.

Industrial hemp is grown for its fiber and its oil, and can be used to make rope, clothes, paper, plastics, insulation and biofuel.

Sen. Lonnie Paxton (R-Tuttle) is one of the bill's authors. He says the new industry could create thousands of jobs and pour millions of dollars into the state's economy.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated Wednesday, April 18 at 10:05 a.m.

Residents of Seiling and Oakwood were evacuated in northwest Oklahoma yesterday, as large fires grew due to high winds, low humidity, and drought conditions.

But officials with Oklahoma Forestry Services say new fire starts were kept to a minimum yesterday, despite the historic fire weather conditions.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

After nine days of rallying at the state capitol, union leaders say the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

The president of the Oklahoma Education Association, Alicia Priest, said on Thursday that despite thousands of people calling on lawmakers to increase school funding, educators have seen no significant legislative movement since last Friday.

She said the union polled its members, and a majority doubted that continuing the walkout would result in more money for schools.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Updated 5:09 p.m.

The state's largest teachers union have announced the Oklahoma teacher walkout is over.

In a press conference this afternoon, Oklahoma Education Association president Alicia Priest said some schools and teachers may continue to walk, but that is up to them and their school boards.

Priest declared the walkout a victory, saying teachers had secured an additional half a billion dollars for public education, but Senate leaders refused to do more this year, and that was the reason for calling things off.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

As Oklahoma's teacher walkout enters its eighth day, the union leading it has a new demand to end it.

Oklahoma Education Association is now saying lawmakers just need to raise another $50 million in revenue for the state budget, and they'll send educators back to school.

Katherine Bishop, OEA Vice President, says it's up to lawmakers to find the money. She doesn't care whether it comes from a wind tax or a repeal of the capital gains exemption, she just wants to see the legislature raise another $50 million to shore up the state budget.

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