Neva Hill

Neva Hill is in her 16th year as a political commentator for KOSU.

Hill been professionally active in Oklahoma Republican politics and journalism for 30 years. She is the owner and president of Neva Hill & Company, a full-service political consulting and public relations firm located in south Oklahoma City. Currently, Hill is a consultant to a number of federal, statewide, county, and legislative officeholders across Oklahoma. She has also been a political analyst for OETA-TV election night coverage the last four years.

She was also the publisher and editor of The Hill Report, an insider’s report on Oklahoma politics and government which ended 26 years of weekly print publication when it was sold to an online political newsletter owned by Mike McCarville in the fall of 2006. 

In 2004, she was named one of three Oklahoma women to serve on the National Steering Committee for “W Stands for Women” – along with then-Lt. Governor Mary Fallin and Terry Neese, president of Women Impacting Public Policy. In 1992, Neva served as State Director of the Bush-Quayle campaign.

Hill served as Assistant Commissioner of Labor for the State of Oklahoma in 1987 under Governor Henry Bellmon. The following year she managed the successful state senate campaign for Tom Cole, who now represents Oklahoma’s Fourth District in the United States Congress.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel talk about Governor Fallin's eighth and final State of the State Address as well as a protest at the end of the speech and lawmakers begin voting on measures containing the Step Up Oklahoma plan.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about legislative leaders wanting to move quickly on revenue and policy proposals from civic and business leaders known as Step Up Oklahoma and the 2018 regular session begins on Monday with the Governor's State of the State Address.

The trio also discusses the resignation of Oklahoma City Public School Superintendent Aurora Lora and Congressman Tom Cole vying to become the next U.S. House Appropriations Chairman.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about lawmakers resuming the second special session the day after starting the 2018 regular session, SoonerPoll releases results of a survey on the contenders for Governor in the primaries this June and another SoonerPoll showing unfavorable ratings for Governor Fallin and the State Legislature.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and OKC Democratic Representative Forrest Bennett about a private-sector group known as Step Up Oklahoma introducing recommendations to the legislature to fix the budget as well as other policy issues and a new SoonerPoll shows 62% support for a medical marijuana state question going before voters this June.

The trio also discusses news of a GPS tracker getting attached to the truck of Moore Republican Representative Mark McBride.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Governor's threat to veto any budget bill in the second special session which doesn't include a pay raise for teachers, the Oklahoma Education Association releases a poll showing support in Oklahoma for a teacher pay raise and the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association challenges the constitutionality of an initiative petition to increase taxes on oil and gas wells to fund education.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the budget situation as lawmakers still haven't balanced the budget in the current fiscal year which ends July 1st and the State Department of Health announcing cuts which could result in nearly 200 employees getting laid off as well as ending programs.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a special session called by Governor Fallin for Monday, December 18th, investigations and more firings at the State Department of Health and Governor Fallin issues an executive order to crack down on sexual harassment in state government.

The trio also discusses the Oklahoma City mayoral race and controversy grows over comments from former Oklahoma City Mayor Kirk Humphreys.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Oklahoma Health Care Authority cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates 6% to most health care providers and 1% to nursing homes while the Attorney General, State Auditor and even the House of Representatives begin investigations of possible fiscal mismanagement at the Department of Health and lawmakers await an announcement on another special session to deal with the budget shortfall.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel talk about Governor Fallin vetoing a budget bill and telling lawmakers they would have to return for a second special session and then turning around and calling on common and higher education officials to find efficiencies in their budgets to include possible consolidation of schools.

The trio also discusses the 8.8% pay cut by the Legislative Compensation Commission and a signature petition to increase teacher pay in Oklahoma City comes up short.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the latest fix for the $215M shortfall in the budget made up with cash reserves and cuts to state agencies and the special elections this week where Republicans managed to hold on to two seats, but lost one in Tulsa.

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