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Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahomans voted in 2016 to reduce penalties for drug possession and this year approved a state question welcoming medical marijuana into the state. Officials in two cities recently reacted to those decisions. 

Oklahoma City, the state’s largest municipality, has chosen to reduce fines and eliminate jail terms for marijuana possession. 

Headlines for Wednesday, September 26, 2018:

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Caroline Halter / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Mike Couke runs the Comanche County Democratic Party out of a one-room office nestled between a laundromat and a barbershop in Lawton. This year, he’s focused on training local Democrats to make better use of voter lists ahead of the general election.

“The best way to reach voters is to knock on doors. And that's one thing the list gives you is physical addresses,” Couke said.

Larry Bush, a Democrat running for Lawton’s House District 62, sits next to him. He’s running for a second time after losing in 2016.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

You might notice something new when you walk into your local liquor store on Monday, October First.

The changes are coming after Oklahomans overwhelmingly supported State Question 792 back in November of 2016.

While liquor stores are getting extra options, big box stores like Wal-Mart are also getting to sell cold beer and wine which raises concens among most owners.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to talk to Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma President Bryan Kerr about what people should expect with the new law.

Headlines for Tuesday, September 25, 2018:

Headlines for Monday, September 24, 2018:

Headlines for Friday, September 21, 2018:

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about State Question 793 which alters the state constitution allowing big box stores like Wal-Mart to have optometrists and eye exams and House Minority Leader Steve Kouplen reiterates his call for a special session to deal with medical marijuana especially in regard to labeling and testing guidelines.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma education leaders say a state question designed to give districts more spending flexibility will do little to improve public schools’ financial difficulties.

State Question 801 would allow school leaders to spend money in their building fund — currently restricted for things like construction projects, maintenance and repairs, utilities, and custodians’ salaries — in new ways.

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