Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

A federal judge in New York has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman ordered the administration to stop its plans to include the controversial question on forms for the upcoming national head count "without curing the legal defects" the judge identified in his opinion released on Tuesday . Furman's decision marks a significant milestone in a legal battle that began shortly after the Trump...

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Tribal Media Outlet Loses Free-Press Protections

Mvskoke Media a print and broadcast outlet that covers tribal affairs for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in Oklahoma was considered the gold standard for press freedom in Indian Country until last November, when the nations chief and council placed the outlet under the control of the executive branch. To say that its independent news when the managing editor sits under tourism and recreation, which sits under the secretary of the nation and commerce all of those people answer to the chief,...

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It's Official: The Partial Government Shutdown Is The Longest In U.S. History

The partial government shutdown is now the longest in history, as Saturday marks Day 22. The previous record was 21 days, set in the winter of 1995-96 when President Bill Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich were at odds over budget cuts. Congress went home for the weekend, as some 800,000 federal workers are on furlough, and many have now gone without their first paycheck. Mortgages are held up, security personnel at airports are strained, Coast Guard families line up at a food pantry ,...

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It's been so hot and dry this summer that climatologists say the southern part of the United States is going through an "exceptional drought."

Parts of Oklahoma have seen little rain since October — not to mention a string of 100-degree days. The steamy conditions are pressuring the state's water needs.

About 1.2 million people live in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, and they are putting a drain on the city's water supplies.

America's South, Midwest and Southwest are suffering through drought and high heat. Those regions have braved a string of days that saw temperatures in the high 90s, with heat indexes commonly reaching above 110 degrees.

But forecasters say much of the eastern U.S. will experience a gradual cool-down in the next few days. "New York and the D.C. area will drop down intothe lower 80s by Friday," the AP said, "while Atlanta drops to the upper 80s Friday and Saturday."

Before he was in the national spotlight, Bradley Manning, the Army intelligence analyst who now faces charges of giving classified material to WikiLeaks, was an isolated young man with a troubled family life, according to Frontline correspondent Martin Smith.

In a profile of the jailed soldier for Frontline, Smith conducted extensive interviews with Manning's family and friends. Smith says his goal was to explore Manning's life before his arrest last summer.

President Obama's Friday news conference, which reporters were informed of the day earlier, was initially intended to give him a chance to respond to increasing Republican attacks on his energy policy.

With rising gas prices in recent weeks as the backdrop, Republicans have charged that his administration's restrictions on domestic oil production were keeping gas prices higher than they'd be otherwise.

A federal judge on Monday temporarily stopped Oklahoma's new anti-Shariah law from taking effect.

Oklahoma's law -- a ballot initiative approved by 70 percent of Oklahomans in the Nov. 2 elections -- would change the state constitution to prohibit courts from considering international or Muslim law when deciding cases.

Muneer Awad, head of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, wasn't surprised at the Nov. 2 vote -- but he was sad and worried.

Forty U.S. billionaires pledged Wednesday to give at least half of their wealth to charity -- either during their lifetimes or after death.

That could be a big boost to nonprofits, which have suffered from the recent economic downturn.

The list of those taking the pledge includes some of the nation's wealthiest individuals: Bill and Melinda Gates, Warren Buffett, T. Boone Pickens, Michael Bloomberg and George Lucas of Star Wars fame.

jdaverhea.com

The Story focused on "Music And The Internet" today and brought on The Journal Record's Dave Rhea to talk about his rock and roll past.

Once upon a time, the music industry was the place where stars were made, and a lot of other people made a lot of money. Not any longer. Today on the program, two stories, two guys who once banked their future on the music biz ... and have now been forced to move on. 

NBA's Thunder Strikes Gold In Oklahoma City

Apr 22, 2010

Oklahoma City will experience something new tonight: NBA playoff basketball.

Not only are the Oklahoma City Thunder in the postseason -- the team is favored tonight over the defending champion Los Angeles Lakers, even though the Lakers lead the series 2-0.

The Thunder are a great turnaround story. Last year, they were one of the worst teams in the NBA. And two years ago they were in Seattle, playing as the SuperSonics.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

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Education News

Jack Silva didn't know anything about how children learn to read. What he did know is that a lot of students in his district were struggling.

Silva is the chief academic officer for Bethlehem, Pa., public schools. In 2015, only 56 percent of third-graders were scoring proficient on the state reading test. That year, he set out to do something about that.

"It was really looking yourself in the mirror and saying, 'Which 4 in 10 students don't deserve to learn to read?' " he recalls.

A federal commission led by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recommends rescinding Obama-era guidance intended to reduce racial discrimination in school discipline. And, DeVos says, it urges schools to "seriously consider partnering with local law enforcement in the training and arming of school personnel."

Students in U.S. schools were less likely to be suspended in 2016 than they were in 2012. But the progress is incremental, and large gaps — by race and by special education status — remain.

This data comes from an analysis of federal data for NPR in partnership with the nonprofit organization Child Trends. And it comes as the Trump administration is preparing the final report from a school safety commission that is expected to back away from or rescind Obama-era guidance intended to reduce racial disparities in school discipline.

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