Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Political Pendulum Swings in Former Conservative Stronghold That Launched a Republican Governor

Sue Campbell and her husband David stand under a tree at a dog park along a busy highway near Lake Hefner. Their dog is here, too — a 3-year-old ball of furry energy named Louie. “Louie is a miniature schnauzer and Staffordshire terrier mix,” Sue said. Sue is an accounting clerk and Democrat. David is a retired Ford salesman and reserve deputy sheriff, and he’s a Republican. The couple are long-time residents of House District 85 in northwestern Oklahoma City. For decades, the district was a...

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You're Not Late! It Might Just Be Changes to Morning Edition

You may have noticed some changes to your Morning Edition listening experience this week. That's because NPR has changed the timing of their 'clock.' It's the first change to Morning Edition's clock since 2014 . NPR provides 'clocks' for most of their national shows, so local stations like KOSU know when to best air local news, weather and information. The new changes that have been made are designed to deliver a live and “in-the-moment” experience for our listeners, with the show being...

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Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Education And Tax Vote Winning And Costing Oklahoma Candidates Elections

About 100 teachers and school administrators filed for political office in the 2018 election. Most are not shy about supporting the first tax increase in nearly three decades, even though it’s a progressive political message in a deeply conservative state. Pro-tax campaigns from educators seem to be resonating with voters in many parts of Oklahoma — but not everywhere. Polarizing tax package Oklahoma lawmakers passed a $450 million tax increase to pay for the first state-funded teacher raises...

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Part 2 of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

Karen Howe couldn't believe her luck. As a single mom working a minimum-wage job and living with two kids in a crowded one-bedroom apartment in Ponca City, Okla., she was desperate for a three-bedroom house and a lawn.

Howe, a member of the Ponca tribe, was offered tribal housing in a small, tree-lined subdivision of 11 homes on the southern, rural edge of the city.

From Los Angeles to New York City and Miami to Dallas, professional basketball fans face November without the NBA. The league keeps canceling games because of the ongoing lockout as players and owners squabble over future contracts.

Most NBA cities have other professional sports to turn to with hoops on hiatus. But some markets, like downtown Oklahoma City, only have one game in town.

It's been so hot and dry this summer that climatologists say the southern part of the United States is going through an "exceptional drought."

Parts of Oklahoma have seen little rain since October — not to mention a string of 100-degree days. The steamy conditions are pressuring the state's water needs.

About 1.2 million people live in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, and they are putting a drain on the city's water supplies.

America's South, Midwest and Southwest are suffering through drought and high heat. Those regions have braved a string of days that saw temperatures in the high 90s, with heat indexes commonly reaching above 110 degrees.

But forecasters say much of the eastern U.S. will experience a gradual cool-down in the next few days. "New York and the D.C. area will drop down intothe lower 80s by Friday," the AP said, "while Atlanta drops to the upper 80s Friday and Saturday."

Before he was in the national spotlight, Bradley Manning, the Army intelligence analyst who now faces charges of giving classified material to WikiLeaks, was an isolated young man with a troubled family life, according to Frontline correspondent Martin Smith.

In a profile of the jailed soldier for Frontline, Smith conducted extensive interviews with Manning's family and friends. Smith says his goal was to explore Manning's life before his arrest last summer.

President Obama's Friday news conference, which reporters were informed of the day earlier, was initially intended to give him a chance to respond to increasing Republican attacks on his energy policy.

With rising gas prices in recent weeks as the backdrop, Republicans have charged that his administration's restrictions on domestic oil production were keeping gas prices higher than they'd be otherwise.

A federal judge on Monday temporarily stopped Oklahoma's new anti-Shariah law from taking effect.

Oklahoma's law -- a ballot initiative approved by 70 percent of Oklahomans in the Nov. 2 elections -- would change the state constitution to prohibit courts from considering international or Muslim law when deciding cases.

Muneer Awad, head of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, wasn't surprised at the Nov. 2 vote -- but he was sad and worried.

Forty U.S. billionaires pledged Wednesday to give at least half of their wealth to charity -- either during their lifetimes or after death.

That could be a big boost to nonprofits, which have suffered from the recent economic downturn.

The list of those taking the pledge includes some of the nation's wealthiest individuals: Bill and Melinda Gates, Warren Buffett, T. Boone Pickens, Michael Bloomberg and George Lucas of Star Wars fame.

jdaverhea.com

The Story focused on "Music And The Internet" today and brought on The Journal Record's Dave Rhea to talk about his rock and roll past.

Once upon a time, the music industry was the place where stars were made, and a lot of other people made a lot of money. Not any longer. Today on the program, two stories, two guys who once banked their future on the music biz ... and have now been forced to move on. 

NBA's Thunder Strikes Gold In Oklahoma City

Apr 22, 2010

Oklahoma City will experience something new tonight: NBA playoff basketball.

Not only are the Oklahoma City Thunder in the postseason -- the team is favored tonight over the defending champion Los Angeles Lakers, even though the Lakers lead the series 2-0.

The Thunder are a great turnaround story. Last year, they were one of the worst teams in the NBA. And two years ago they were in Seattle, playing as the SuperSonics.

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Join us in Tulsa on November 15th!

Education News

Oklahoma State School Board Association

Results from a new survey show the recent teacher pay raise has had little immediate effect on the state’s teacher shortage, and that schools will still start the year with nearly 500 unfilled positions.

276 superintendents responded to the Oklahoma State School Board Association’s survey on the teacher shortage.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

About 100 teachers and school administrators filed for political office in the 2018 election. Most are not shy about supporting the first tax increase in nearly three decades, even though it’s a progressive political message in a deeply conservative state.

Pro-tax campaigns from educators seem to be resonating with voters in many parts of Oklahoma — but not everywhere.

Polarizing tax package

Josh Robinson

Summer is almost over for 46,000 students enrolled in Oklahoma City Public Schools. Wednesday is the first day of class in the state’s largest school district, which has a new superintendent — its eighth one in the past decade.

Sean McDaniel became the district’s new superintendent in late May. Before that, he led Mustang Public Schools for six years.

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.