Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Political Pendulum Swings in Former Conservative Stronghold That Launched a Republican Governor

Sue Campbell and her husband David stand under a tree at a dog park along a busy highway near Lake Hefner. Their dog is here, too — a 3-year-old ball of furry energy named Louie. “Louie is a miniature schnauzer and Staffordshire terrier mix,” Sue said. Sue is an accounting clerk and Democrat. David is a retired Ford salesman and reserve deputy sheriff, and he’s a Republican. The couple are long-time residents of House District 85 in northwestern Oklahoma City. For decades, the district was a...

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You're Not Late! It Might Just Be Changes to Morning Edition

You may have noticed some changes to your Morning Edition listening experience this week. That's because NPR has changed the timing of their 'clock.' It's the first change to Morning Edition's clock since 2014 . NPR provides 'clocks' for most of their national shows, so local stations like KOSU know when to best air local news, weather and information. The new changes that have been made are designed to deliver a live and “in-the-moment” experience for our listeners, with the show being...

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Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Education And Tax Vote Winning And Costing Oklahoma Candidates Elections

About 100 teachers and school administrators filed for political office in the 2018 election. Most are not shy about supporting the first tax increase in nearly three decades, even though it’s a progressive political message in a deeply conservative state. Pro-tax campaigns from educators seem to be resonating with voters in many parts of Oklahoma — but not everywhere. Polarizing tax package Oklahoma lawmakers passed a $450 million tax increase to pay for the first state-funded teacher raises...

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Sea surface waters off the Southern California coast are setting records for warmth this summer. Last week, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego recorded its highest ocean temperature ever, 79.2 degrees.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young asks Daniel Rudnick, professor of oceanography at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, what’s going on.

Headlines for Wednesday, August 15, 2018:

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

Lee Reynolds spent part of his childhood in rural southeastern Oklahoma in the 1950s. He came to the StoryCorps mobile booth with his son Chad and talked about growing up as the son of the area’s only doctor.

Kateleigh Mills / KOSU Radio

The Oklahoma City Council approved an ordinance on Tuesday to impound the Bird electric scooters beginning Monday, August 20th,  if the company fails to file a revocable permit with the city. 

The rental service dropped off dozens of electric scooters in downtown OKC without notice two weeks ago. The scooters are being parked and rented on public right-of-ways, in violation of city ordinances.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Sue Campbell and her husband David stand under a tree at a dog park along a busy highway near Lake Hefner. Their dog is here, too — a 3-year-old ball of furry energy named Louie.

“Louie is a miniature schnauzer and Staffordshire terrier mix,” Sue said.

Oklahoma State School Board Association

Results from a new survey show the recent teacher pay raise has had little immediate effect on the state’s teacher shortage, and that schools will still start the year with nearly 500 unfilled positions.

276 superintendents responded to the Oklahoma State School Board Association’s survey on the teacher shortage.

You may have noticed some changes to your Morning Edition listening experience this week. That's because NPR has changed the timing of their 'clock.' It's the first change to Morning Edition's clock since 2014.

NPR provides 'clocks' for most of their national shows, so local stations like KOSU know when to best air local news, weather and information.

For people who make too much money to qualify for health insurance subsidies on the individual market, there may be no Goldilocks moment when shopping for a plan. No choice is just right.

A policy with an affordable premium may come with a deductible that's too high. If the copayments for physician visits are reasonable, the plan may not include their preferred doctors.

These consumers need better options, and in early August federal officials offered a strategy to help bring down costs for them.

Headlnies for Tuesday, August 14, 2018:

My back hurts when I sit down.

It's been going on for 10 years. It really doesn't matter where I am — at work, at a restaurant, even on our couch at home. My lower back screams, "Stop sitting!"

To try to reduce the pain, I bought a kneeling chair at work. Then I got a standing desk. Then I went back to a regular chair because standing became painful.

I've seen physical therapists, orthopedic surgeons and pain specialists. I've mastered Pilates, increased flexibility and strengthened muscles. At one point, my abs were so strong my husband nicknamed them "the plate."

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Join us in Tulsa on November 15th!

Education News

Oklahoma State School Board Association

Results from a new survey show the recent teacher pay raise has had little immediate effect on the state’s teacher shortage, and that schools will still start the year with nearly 500 unfilled positions.

276 superintendents responded to the Oklahoma State School Board Association’s survey on the teacher shortage.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

About 100 teachers and school administrators filed for political office in the 2018 election. Most are not shy about supporting the first tax increase in nearly three decades, even though it’s a progressive political message in a deeply conservative state.

Pro-tax campaigns from educators seem to be resonating with voters in many parts of Oklahoma — but not everywhere.

Polarizing tax package

Josh Robinson

Summer is almost over for 46,000 students enrolled in Oklahoma City Public Schools. Wednesday is the first day of class in the state’s largest school district, which has a new superintendent — its eighth one in the past decade.

Sean McDaniel became the district’s new superintendent in late May. Before that, he led Mustang Public Schools for six years.

More Education News
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Hear Ferris O'Brien every weeknight, from 7 p.m. to midnight, on The Spy.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.