Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

'Educator Caucus' Falls Short Of Election Goals, But Vows To Keep Pushing For More School Funding

It’s about 9 p.m. in Coweta, a rural town south east of Tulsa. The election results are still trickling in as Cyndi Ralston, a second-grade teacher -turned Democratic political candidate, steps on to the stage in the small event space where she’s having her watch party. Framed by red, white and blue balloons, Ralston tells the crowd of about 30 supporters why she decided to run for the House District 12 seat. “I ran this year so that no teacher would have to walkout again,” she said. “I ran...

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The Florida Recount Of 2000: A Nightmare That Goes On Haunting

Want to feel old? Consider the fact that babies who were crying in cribs while their parents agonized over Florida's protracted presidential recount in 2000 are now of voting age. Eighteen years is a long time. Even so, when we think of that time, many of us conjure up memories as sharp as barbed wire, roll our eyes or sigh out loud when anyone mentions "Florida 2000." That phrase is being invoked a lot in light of this year's ultra-tight Florida statewide elections. While the stakes might...

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Michelle Obama Tells The Story Of 'Becoming' Herself — And The Struggle To Hang On

In her new book, Becoming , former first lady Michelle Obama writes about the profound frustration of being misunderstood — of being pegged as an "angry black woman." She writes about the discomfort of being a hyperaccomplished woman only recognized through her connection to a powerful man. She writes about the power in telling one's own story, on one's own terms. So it's perhaps a cruel irony that the first headlines about Obama's book have been about her anger at Trump. And that's because...

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A Marvel Of A Man: Stan Lee Dead At 95

6 hours ago

American comic book writer, editor, publisher and former President of Marvel Comics Stan Lee died Monday at the age of 95.

Lee gave us over six decades of work like The Incredible Hulk and The Amazing Spider-Man — superheroes we could identify with, characters that allowed us to suspend our disbelief because they reacted to bizarre situations like you or I might.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Wildfires continued to tear through Northern and Southern California on Monday, where firefighters were at the mercy of dry air and whipping winds fanning the deadly blazes. At least 31 people have died statewide; more than 200 people remain unaccounted for.

In a year of record-breaking fires, Cal Fire Chief Ken Pimlott told NPR's All Things Considered the Camp fire in the north and Woolsey fire in the south may be "the most destructive and the deadliest" on record for the state.

You've likely heard the idea that sitting is the new smoking.

Compared with 1960, workers in the U.S. burn about 140 fewer calories, on average, per day due to our sedentary office jobs. And, while it's true that sitting for prolonged periods is bad for your health, the good news is that we can offset the damage by adding more physical activity to our days.

Local Headlines for Monday, November 12, 2018:

As temperatures start to dip below freezing, an Oklahoma City advertiser is asking for the public's help to get coats to the men and women who sell The Curbside Chronicle on the streets.

Insight Creative Group held its first coat drive last year and received nearly 500 coats for the homeless.

ICG Content Manager Lisha Dunlap would love to see a repeat of the generosity she saw last year.

Want to feel old? Consider the fact that babies who were crying in cribs while their parents agonized over Florida's protracted presidential recount in 2000 are now of voting age.

Eighteen years is a long time. Even so, when we think of that time, many of us conjure up memories as sharp as barbed wire, roll our eyes or sigh out loud when anyone mentions "Florida 2000."

That phrase is being invoked a lot in light of this year's ultra-tight Florida statewide elections.

The next Congress is going to be missing some familiar faces. Thanks to a mix of retirements and defeats on Tuesday, some high-profile lawmakers will soon be exiting Capitol Hill.

Some were longtime Democratic targets in the Senate that the GOP finally vanquished. Others were vocal Republican critics of President Trump who chose not to run for re-election. Others simply thought it was time to hang it up — including the outgoing speaker of the House, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.).

Here are 10 of the most notable politicians making their exit from Washington:

President Trump met with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron on Saturday — a visit that began with a spat as dozens of leaders came together to commemorate the centennial anniversary of World War I's end and all that has since been built between nations in a multilateral world.

Federal regulators want to ban the sale of most flavored e-cigarettes at retail locations like gas stations and convenience stores and require anyone buying e-cigarettes online to verify their age.

Oil prices have been falling dramatically since hitting four-year highs in October. On Thursday, two benchmarks — Brent Crude and West Texas Intermediate — fell to prices that are around 20 percent lower than a month earlier. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor for Bloomberg News.

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Education News

Hello! We know there's a lot of news out there, but we're bringing you an education-centric take on the midterms, with big results in some key states.

Arizona

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s about 9 p.m. in Coweta, a rural town south east of Tulsa.

The election results are still trickling in as Cyndi Ralston, a second-grade teacher -turned Democratic political candidate, steps on to the stage in the small event space where she’s having her watch party.

Framed by red, white and blue balloons, Ralston tells the crowd of about 30 supporters why she decided to run for the House District 12 seat.

“I ran this year so that no teacher would have to walkout again,” she said. “I ran this year so that no family would have to lose their insurance again.”

Oklahoma educators Sherrie Conley and Steve Jarman each remember the exact moment they decided to run for office.

It was April 2, the first day of that state's teacher walkout, and thousands of educators had swarmed the Capitol in Oklahoma City, demanding more school funding and higher wages.

More Education News

KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.